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Our climate change

adaptation projects in the Pacific
© SPC
Our climate change
Our climate change
adaptation projects in the Pacific
© SPC
© SPC

Empowering community resilience through reforestation and coral reef restoration in Vanuatu

 Vanuatu
Empowering community resilience through reforestation and coral reef restoration in Vanuatu
Local Project
LAMACCA


Project news


ESMS capacity building workshops for local grantees in Fiji and Vanuatu

9 December 2022

ESMS capacity building workshops for local grantees in Fiji and Vanuatu

@ Kiwa Initiative

Our partner, IUCN - ORO, the Oceania regional office of International Union for Conservation of Nature, organized capacity building workshops on Environmental and Social Management Systems (ESMS) for the "Mangrove Restoration and Management in Fiji" project, implemented by Community Centred Conservation (C3), and the "Coral Reef Restoration in Vanuatu" project, implemented by Lamacca Climate Change Association.

Did you know? IUCN - ORO, the Oceania regional office of International Union for Conservation of Nature, is responsible for managing the implementation of local Kiwa Initiative projects.

As part of this, our IUCN colleagues visited Labasa, Fiji, from November 09 to 11 to meet with the C3 team (Community Centred Conservation), managing a Kiwa project that supports the restoration of mangrove forest and associated livehoods within locally managed marine areas.

From November 26 to December 01, they were in Malekula, Vanuatu, monitoring a coral reef restoration project implemented by Lamacca Climate Change Association, which aims to restore, preserve and conserve natural and marine resources in a vulnerable state. IUCN staff provide training on the Environmental and Social Management System (ESMS), a procedure that ensures that potential negative impacts are avoided/minimized, and positive impacts are widely encouraged.

Project monitoring and community capacity building are key objectives of the Kiwa Initiative.

Resilience in the face of cyclones: testimony of a Kiwa on-grantee

1 November 2023

Resilience in the face of cyclones: testimony of a Kiwa on-grantee

@ Lamacca

In the wake of the recent tropical cyclone Lola in Vanuatu, the Southern and Southeast regions of Malekula, as well as other islands including Epi, Paama, Ambrym and Pentecost, experienced devastating impacts. These areas were categorized as “priority 1” for urgent government humanitarian response. Countless homes, gardens, farms, infrastructure, and schools suffered severe damage.

Even our local Kiwa project run by LAMACCA has not been spared, they find strength in resilience.

“Our LAMACCA Kiwa Office, along with all project equipment and materials, remained safe. LAMACCA's training hall and other community centers opened their doors as evacuation shelters. While the cyclone has moved on, some of our fellow community members still seek refuge in these centers due to their severely damaged homes. Fortunately, there have been no casualties reported at this time. We stand united, ready to recover, rebuild, and adapt. This is not our first encounter with cyclones, and it won’t be our last. We thank the Kiwa Initiative and IUCN Oceania team for the support and concern”, says Peter, the LAMACCA project leader and coordinator for the Kiwa project.

At the Kiwa Initiative®, we take pride in cultivating climate-resilient communities and facing the challenges of climate change head-on.
We extend our best wishes to all the communities in Vanuatu, particularly the LAMACCA team, collaborating with other organizations and mobilizing to work alongside provincial and national government agencies in recovery efforts.

The local community of Lamap in Vanuatu offered a traditional welcome to IUCN

12 December 2022

The local community of Lamap in Vanuatu offered a traditional welcome to IUCN

@ Kiwa Initiative

The local community of #Lamap in Vanuatu, offered a #traditional welcome to IUCN, to show their deep appreciation of the conservation work that will be implemented by the Kiwa Initiative grantees.

Watch the video of the traditional dance: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iip_1oYGvBo

 

  • Project name:
    Reforestation and coral reef restoration
  • Project Coordinator:
    Lamacca Climate Change Association Committee (Inc.)
  • Project Start:
    July 2022
  • Estimated term:
    December 2023
  • Amount of funding:
    € 85,569

The purpose of this project is to address some of the environmental issues and threats caused by the impact of the climate change, deforestation, development and over-harvesting activities by growing population. It aims to restore, protect and preserve the ecosystem services including natural and marine resources and manage sustainable use of the resources, while conserve vulnerable endanger species.

In Vanuatu, biodiversity is categorized as food, culture, tradition, money, medicine, shelter, fresh air (oxygen), firewood, coastline stabiliser, protector against storm surge, protector of fresh water systems, carbon sequester, ecosystem-based adaptation to climate change, ecosystem-based approaches to disaster risk reduction, and beautiful sceneries for enjoyment through camping, picnicking, swimming and snorkelling. Biodiversity is vital for all Ni-Vans’ survival. Vanuatu is within the East Melanesian Islands Biodiversity Hot Spot region that needs attention for the protection of its unique flora and fauna. It has a number of endemic plant and animal species that are not found elsewhere and some are at risk of becoming extinct if measures are not continuously taken to protect them.

Vanuatu also show its commitment to protect and conserve our biodiversity through the inclusion of environment as one of the three main pillars of the National Sustainable Development Plan(NSDP) that is directly linked to policy objectives of the National Environment Policy and Implementation Plan (NEPIP). Other relevant policies ranging from climate change and overarching productive sectors’ policy and other respective natural resource management sector policies also include measures towards protection, conservation andsustainable use of biodiversity.

Biological diversity underpins ecosystem functioning and the provision of ecosystem services essential for human well-being. As mentioned above, it provides for food security, human health, and clean air and water; contributes to local livelihoods, and economic development; and isessential for the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), including poverty reduction. In addition, it is a central component of many belief systems, worldviews and identities. Yet despite its fundamental importance, biodiversity continues to be lost.

The greatest threats to biodiversity and ecosystem services are result from human activities. Human settlements are generally found concentrated in the coastal lowlands. Consequently, biodiversity is most at risk in lowland and coastal areas and small islands, yet remains relatively intact in the high altitude forests of larger islands. The forests of Vanuatu have been also impacted by human activities, which have diminished and altered forest cover and biodiversity. Poor agricultural practices often result in loss of riparian habitat, erosion of soil and increased turbidity which may disrupt feeding success of fishes. Forest clearance and land reclamation affect river flows and water temperature in some catchments. Also, changes in the marine environment resulting from human activities are occurring faster than previously anticipated, affecting, especially, vulnerable marine ecosystems such as coral reefs. Of the above mentioned threats and challenges, the local communities of South Malekula are vulnerable to these threats and needed actions for biodiversity and ecosystem services restorations, protections and better management.

Thus, the purpose of this project is to address some of the environmental issues and threats caused by the impact of the climate change, deforestation, development and over-harvesting activities by growing population. It aims to restore, protect and preserve the ecosystem services including natural and marine resources and manage sustainable use of the resources, while conserve vulnerable endanger species. It will involve zoning, territorial mapping and demarcation for self-isolation and conservation, re-planting of trees and coral reefs restoration activities. It will also empower the local authorities to develop and set up a community environmental policy(CEP) and an Environment Management System (EMS) aligning with the National Environment Policies to restore and protect the biodiversity and ecosystem services in the project targeted areas. The project merit is a nature-based approach to climate change adaptation that will harnesses the capacity of nature to buffer communities against the adverse impacts of climate change through sustainable delivery of ecosystems services. The project will promote a culture of unity and enhance local governance by working with traditional chiefs, women & youth groups, and people with special needs to understand the importance of preserving biodiversity system, cultural sites, heritages, boundaries, etc. through the traditional knowledge and practices that are bound to bevanishing.

 

Project objectives ?

«By 2030, 80% of South Malekula biodiversity ecosystem services are restored, protected, conserved and the sustainable use of natural & marine resources are well managed for future generations, and thus become a successful eco-tourism attraction.»

General Objectives:

«To contribute to the fulfilment of the Environment Pillar for the National Sustainable Development Goals and Policies 2016-2030 environment goals and policies.»

  • To improve knowledge on good agricultural, forestry and fisheries practices, and the sustainable use of biodiversity resources and ecosystem services of the vulnerable citizens of South Malekula, Vanuatu.
  • To strengthen rural communities in South Malekula for Sustainable-use of biodiversity and ecosystem services by 20% in 2025, and strengthen all community conservation committees to manage & monitor biodiversity resources and conserve vulnerable species.
  • Empowering rural communities to employ cost-efficient nature-based solutions to achieve rights-based, gender-sensitive and socially inclusive with measurable benefits for climate change adaptation by 15% in 2030. 

 

Info+

Culture is also a resource for climate adaptation because cultural heritage, natural heritage and traditional knowledge all support the resilience of communities to respond to climate change impacts, including extreme weather, natural disasters and conflicts. Changing in the weather pattern is primarily a threat that has physical impacts. It affects cultural heritage through temperature changes, soil erosion, flooding and storms as well as natural heritage through the melting of glaciers and habitat changes. Sadly, in recent decades, the sea-level rise puts the coastal heritage site at risk, and the escalation of sea-level rise and coastal erosion due to climate change exacerbated by local land-use practices has resulted in the loss of some structures and archaeological deposits. Culture in an environmental factor. Alongside economic factors, culture is probably one of the most important environmental variables to consider in global marketing.

Culture is very often hidden from view and can be easily overlooked. Thus, it is important to preserve traditional indigenous culture. Culture and its heritage reflect and shape values, beliefs, and aspirations, thereby defining a people's national identity. It is important to preserve our cultural heritage, because it keeps our integrity as a people. Furthermore, the environment influence cultural identity. Cultural influences like customs-family traditions, music, religion and language-are part of the environment. The family environment provides a scaffold for children to develop understanding about themselves and about the community around. It is vital to strenghthen and preserve an environmental culture. The total of learned behavior, attitudes, practices and knowledge that a society has with respect to maintaining or protecting its natural resources, the ecosystem and all other external conditions affecting human life.

 

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